13 Websites To Get Help With Programming

INTRODUCTION

I NEED HELP!

Welcome to a list of websites to get help with programming. Oh no! A certain master code ninja blogger is not responding to your questions. What is happening, and what should you do to get help? First, keep calm, don’t rage, and don’t spam. Just on this very Code Boxx itself, my spam filter has blocked over 3,000 spam comments in a month (at the time of writing).

The more you try to post comments to get attention in a short span of time, the more the spam filters will recognize you as a threat. Especially to those who link directly to your own project, paste whole blocks of code, or even single-word comments such as “hi” and “up”.

Guess this situation happens with just any other bloggers. We get a lot of questions, but only have so much time to answer. So what’s next when we don’t respond? Try posting on one of the community boards listed below, and see if the guys there can help you.

 

1. STACK OVERFLOW

If you are looking for a large online community of programmers, Stack Overflow is probably one of the biggest and the oldest. This is a question and answer (QNA) website that is by programmers, for programmers… Or for anyone who wants to learn to program.

A good thing about Stack Overflow is that it is not restricted to just web programming. It hosts a ton of other languages – Javascript, Java, C#, PHP, ASP, HTML, CSS, SQL, Python, Ruby, whatever you can think of. Signing up is a breeze if you already have a Google or Facebook account.

 

 

2. REDDIT

Some of you guys may know Reddit as the “holy land of memes, trolls, haters, and flamers”. But nope, Reddit is actually a massive online forum/social/exchange/site thing that hosts almost every topic under the sun – Programming included.

Just do a search for “web development”, “PHP”, “HTML”, “CSS”, or “Javascript”, and you will find plenty of subreddits that can offer help. But be warned – Trolls are still very prevalent on Reddit… Just remember to not feed them.

 

3. QUORA

Quora is a question and answer website that is not particularly for programming alone. Although it does deal with a wide array of topics, there is still a sizable programming community that you can get help from. Just sign up for an account, and ask a new question. One thing to take note in Quora, there is an upvote/downvote system, but it’s kind of messed up.

For example, I once did research for “can HTML contain viruses” on Quora. The most upvoted answer was an “expert” who gave an obviously wrong answer of “yes” – I slammed back with “HTML is essentially a text file, not executable code, therefore cannot contain a virus”. Just be careful with some the most “upvoted answers” there.

 

4. STACK EXCHANGE

Not to be confused with Stack Overflow, Stack Exchange is more like the “superset” of Stack Overflow; Stack Exchange is a compilation of various question and answer communities. Not just for programming, but also everything else. So if you are having trouble with Windows, Linux, Mac, servers, laptops, mobile, or just technical issues in general, this is a good place to haunt.

 

 

5. YAHOO ANSWERS

Yahoo! Answers is one of the older question and answer websites on Earth, been around since 2005. But sadly, even though there is a section on programming, the community just don’t seem to be very big, nor very active. But who knows? Smaller community equals more chance of getting noticed and answered fast.

 

6. GOOGLE GROUPS

If Yahoo offers help, how can Google not have anything similar? Google Groups is actually a less-known service for people to create communities, make discussions together… Something like a forum or a private room. If you already have a Google account, then you can access this service freely.

Although, one problem with Google Groups is finding the right group to join and ask your questions. There are so many “classroom” groups that are created over the years and left inactive. Might take a while to even find one that is active and answers questions.

 

 

7. FACEBOOK

I kid you not. Yes, the largest social media website on Earth is also one of the best places to get help. Just do a search for “learn web development”, “learn programming’, or whatever language that you want – Then restrict to groups only, and join the active ones. Plenty of folks around that will answer your questions.

 

8. CODE PROJECT

Code Project is an ancient one that has survived since the Netscape days. It now holds plenty of programming related news and articles. Of course, a section for you to ask questions. Take note though, you need to be registered first to post questions.

 

9. SITEPOINT

Sitepoint is an Aussie website that is all about web-development, and they have also published some books. What’s important here is that they have a community forum – A rather lively one that you can join and ask away.

 

 

10. CODE RANCH

This is yet another ancient coding website that has been around since 1998… Even the design of the website seems to be stuck in time. Take note – This is not a mobile-friendly website. But don’t be fooled by the design, they still have a rather active forum that covers a wide array of topics.

 

11. BYTES.COM

Once upon a time, this site is known as “thescripts.com”, then it changed to “bytes.com” for some reason. But it did not change the fact that it is still a community of developers (and IT guys). Has quite a large number of members, so join and ask away.

 

12. WEBDEVELOPER.COM

WebDeveloper.com is just as the name implies. It is a community that is all about web development – HTML, CSS, SQL, Ruby, design, and even site management in general. It is a good recommendation for beginners, and more like a traditional forum; Very easy to navigate around, without all the upvote/downvote gimmicks.

 

 

13. DANIWEB.COM

Ah, good old Daniweb. This is another oldie that has been around since the stone age of the Internet. There is a huge community of developers here, and you can be sure to almost get an answer over a wide array of web development topics.

 

P.S. HOW NOT TO ASK QUESTIONS

  • Paste a link to your project, including username and password – Someone please work for me free-of-charge.
  • I need to hand in school assignment tomorrow, do it for me, free-of-charge. RIGHT NOW!
  • I have no idea how to do my own work, please do it for me, free-of-charge.
  • Getting an error, no idea what went wrong. (Please do some research on how to debug before asking questions)
  • No idea how this thing works. (Please be exact with the part you are confused about)
  • It’s not working. (Yep, what is not working!?)

Key point – Be tactful, be concise, be constructive if you want answers. I.E. You don’t just go to a doctor and say “I am sick”. I don’t know where, but I am sick. Describe what you are trying to do, what you have done, what kind of errors you are getting, and what you have tried to do to fix it.

 

CLOSING

WHAT’S NEXT?

Thank you for reading, and we have come to the end of this list. I hope that it has helped you with your project, and if you want to share anything with this list, please feel free to comment below. Good luck and happy coding!

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